The Wildest Myths Viewers Have Been Led to Believe by Movies & Media

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Anything is possible with a little movie magic. Filmmakers, tv producers, and commercial crews take many creative liberties in order to create some pretty crazy myths that viewers start to actually believe are true. Most films and television shows reuse techniques, further convincing that their version of reality is true.

Here are the top cinematic and advertising myths that we’ve all been convinced are true in real life…

Myth #1 – The Rain in “Singin’ In The Rain” Was Actually Milk

Water never shows up too well on camera, so it stands to reason that a few tricks were used for the most famous scene in movie history. Giant arc lamps were brought in to backlight the sprinklers, and poor Gene Kelly ended up singin’ with a 103-degree fever after filming. Milk, though, was never added to the water to make it more visible.

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Myth #2 – A Japanese Woman Died Looking for the “Fargo” Money

“Fargo” isn’t a true story despite the fact that the opening credits say “This is a true story.” So when Takako Knoishi lost her job in Tokyo, booked a holiday to Minnesota, downed two bottles of champagne, and decided to take her own life in a snowdrift, the press thought that her death was just too Coen-esque not to be related to the film.

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The More You Know

  • Like Facebook, Star Wars was originally prefixed by the definite article ‘The’. Much cleaner without it.
  • During the filming of The Grinch, Jim Carrey sought counseling from a Navy SEAL to learn torture-resistance techniques in order to handle the extensive makeup.
  • In Iron Man/Avengers, J.A.R.V.I.S is an acronym for “Just A Rather Very Intelligent System.”
  • The bridge blown up by Eli Wallach and Clint Eastwood in The Good, The Bad and The Ugly was prematurely detonated by a Spanish Army Captain. Upon learning of his mistake the Captain ordered his troops to rebuild the bridge, only for it to suffer another explosion once complete.
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